World Health Organization Lists Twelve Highest Priority Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

When Do I Need An Antibiotic? Do Antibiotics Work?

The World Health Organization (WHO) issued a list of twelve “Priority Pathogens” that pose a great health risk to mankind. The WHO is asking that researchers focus on development of new antibiotics to fight these bacteria.

World Health Organization Lists Twelve Highest Priority Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Austin TX Chiropractor Natural Healthcare without Drugs or MedicineIn a February 27, 2017, release titled, “WHO publishes list of bacteria for which new antibiotics are urgently needed”, the WHO points out that this list represents a growing concern about the ineffectiveness of antibiotic usage against bacteria that have been evolving and adapting quickly.

Dr. Marie-Paule Kieny, WHO’s Assistant Director-General for Health Systems and Innovation stated, “Antibiotic resistance is growing, and we are fast running out of treatment options. If we leave it to market forces alone, the new antibiotics we most urgently need are not going to be developed in time.” In an interview, Dr. Kieny continued, “This list is not meant to scare people about new superbugs. It’s intended to signal research and development priorities to address urgent public health threat.”

Just two days earlier, the Washington Post ran an article titled, “Dangerous antibiotic-resistant infections on the rise for children in the U.S., study finds.” This new study published in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society highlighted how big the problem of antibiotic resistance has become. This study found that 3 out of 5 children admitted to hospitals already had an antibiotic-resistant infection.

Dr. Sharon Meropol, the study’s lead author and an assistant professor of pediatrics, epidemiology and biostatistics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine commented, “Antibiotic resistance increasingly threatens our ability to treat our children’s infections.”

Part of the concern is the over usage of antibiotics not only in human illness, but also in agriculture. Animals are given antibiotics in many cases just as a prevention. The issue is that the bacteria in them become resistant and then find their way to human populations.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, (CDC) for every 1000 people in the US who see a doctor, 842 are given antibiotics. Dr. Theoklis Zaoutis, professor of pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia states that, “About 30 percent of antibiotic use is either inappropriate or unnecessary in the U.S.”

The CDC highlights this growing issue on their website. “Antibiotic resistance is one of the world’s most pressing public health problems. Illnesses that were once easily treatable with antibiotics* are becoming more difficult to cure and more expensive to treat. Infections from common antibiotic-resistant food borne bacteria, such as Salmonella, can cause more severe health outcomes than infections with bacteria that are not resistant to antibiotics.”

The WHO ended their release on this issue with a stern warning that speaks to an overall re-thinking of how we use antibiotics. “While more R&D is vital, alone, it cannot solve the problem. To address resistance, there must also be better prevention of infections and appropriate use of existing antibiotics in humans and animals, as well as rational use of any new antibiotics that are developed in future.”

If you or anyone you know could benefit from a better functioning nervous system, please call us at 512-452-2525 to schedule a consultation with Dr. Swanson. Austin chiropractor located in north central Austin, TX.


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Older Americans Taking More Medications

What is Polypharmacy? Can Chiropractic Care Reduce My Need For Medication?

The headline above comes from a March 21, 2016, Reuters news story published in response to a pre-released study on this subject published in the April 2016 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine. This article, and several others on this same subject, reported on the growing usage of medication by the increasing elderly population.

Older Americans Taking More Medications - Austin Texas Chiropractor help for car accident injuryThe study showed that 87.7% of the population 62 to 85 years old used at least one prescription medication in 2010-2011. This was up from 84.1% in 2005-2006. Even more alarming was that the study showed that people using five or more prescription medications increased from 30.6% to 35.8% in the same five year period.

The Reuters article begins by noting that people using multiple medications, known as polypharmacy, was associated with an increase in major drug interactions in older Americans. Dr. Dima M. Qato, the study’s lead author from the University of Illinois at Chicago, commented, “That’s a concern from a public health standpoint, because it’s getting worse.”

The study showed that because of the increase in polypharmacy, the percentage of people at risk for serious or even life-threatening drug interaction has gone from 8 percent in 2005-2006 to 15 percent in 2011-2012.

Dr. Qato also stated in a CBS interview on this issue, “Many of these potentially deadly drug interactions involve prescription and non-prescription medications and supplements that are not commonly used, but are increasingly being used by older adults. While it is not known how many older adults in the U.S. die of drug interactions, the risk seems to be growing and public awareness is lacking.”

“It is time to take the next leap forward. We need to create systems that support an ongoing process of monitoring medications,” said Michael A. Steinman, M.D., of the University of California, San Francisco, in an accompanying editorial. “Such systems would help us periodically assess the benefits, harms and ongoing need for each of a patient’s medications, as well as the reasonableness of the medication regimen as a whole. These systems could also help physicians with deprescribing, for example by supporting gradual down-titration of a medication and monitoring patients for adverse drug withdrawal reactions after a drug is stopped.”

“As much as we need to support reforms in medication monitoring, we seriously need to examine the culture of taking so many medications,” says Robert Braile D.C. chairman of the International Chiropractors Association Public Relations Committee. “Americans represent about 5% of the world’s population, yet we consume about 50% of the prescription medication in the world. This, coupled with the fact that the U.S. ranks far below many other nations in almost all health statistics except spending, should lead us to question whether or not the culture of a pill for every ill is a healthy and prudent direction.”

If you or anyone you know could benefit from a better functioning nervous system, please call us at 512-452-2525 to schedule a consultation with Dr. Swanson.


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