Study: Smoking Kills 1 in 10 Worldwide

How Many People Die Each Year Due To Smoking? Why Do People Still Smoke?

The headline above comes from a story published on April 6, 2017, by United Press International reporting on an April 5th study published in The Lancet showing that 11% of all deaths world-wide were due to smoking. This translates into 6.4 million deaths due to smoking each year.

Study Smoking Kills 1 in 10 Worldwide-Austin-TX-ATX-Chiropractor-PI-Personal-Injury-Car-Truck-Accident-Collison-Pain-CareThe study also showed that half of those deaths occur in only four countries. Those countries are the United States, Russia, China and India. These numbers are in spite of the fact that most all smokers know the risks and health hazards associated with smoking.

In spite of the facts and figures about the health risks, the study showed that almost 1 billion people worldwide are daily smokers. The numbers are much higher for men that woman. The actual percentage of smokers has actually gone down over the past few decades, but due to the rise in population, the number of smokers has increased.

In the U.S., the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 15 of every 100 U.S. adults age 18 and older smoke cigarettes. Worldwide, India has 11.2% of the world’s total smokers. More men than women smoke but the study showed that USA, China and India, which were the leading three countries in total number of female smokers, accounted for 27.3% of the world’s female smokers. The countries with the most male daily smokers in 2015 were China with 254 million, India with 91 million, and Indonesia with 50 million. The countries with the most female smokers were the Unites States with 17 million, followed by China with 14 million, and India with 13.5 million.

“Despite more than half a century of unequivocal evidence of the harmful effects of tobacco on health, today, 1 in every 4 men in the world is a daily smoker,” said study author Dr. Emmanuela Gakidou, in a press release. “Smoking remains the second-largest risk factor for early death and disability, and so to further reduce its impact we must intensify tobacco control to further reduce smoking prevalence and attributable burden.”

A similar study published in JAMA Internal Medicine late last year showed that 28.6% of all cancer deaths in the US in 2015 were attributable to cigarette smoking. In the conclusion of that study, the authors wrote, “The proportion of cancer deaths attributable to cigarette smoking varies substantially across states and is highest in the South, where up to 40% of cancer deaths in men are caused by smoking. Increasing tobacco control funding, implementing innovative new strategies, and strengthening tobacco control policies and programs, federally and in all states and localities, might further increase smoking cessation, decrease initiation, and reduce the future burden of morbidity and mortality associated with smoking-related cancers.”

In an ongoing attempt to reduce the number of smokers worldwide, in 2003 the World Health Organization created the Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC). The WHO FCTC created guidelines to provide the foundation for countries to implement and manage tobacco control programs. In 2008, the WHO FCTC created the MPOWER measures to help implement the tobacco control measures.

Dr. Douglas Bettcher, Director of the Department of Prevention of Noncommunicable Diseases at WHO headquarters in Geneva stated, “The WHO FCTC and its guidelines provide the foundation for countries to implement and manage tobacco control. The MPOWER measures help make this a reality and have changed the landscape of global tobacco control.” Dr. Bettsher continued, “Along with national and local governments and other partner organizations in high-burden countries, we are making positive change happen in some of the toughest tobacco industry strongholds. Together, we have protected nearly 1.8 billion people with at least one new MPOWER measure at the highest level of achievement since 2007.”

If you or anyone you know could benefit from a better functioning nervous system, please call us at 512-452-2525 to schedule a consultation with Dr. Swanson. Austin chiropractor located in north central Austin, TX.


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FDA Warns Against Using Ovarian Cancer Screening Tests

Should I Have An Ovarian Cancer Screening Test? How Accurate Are Screening Tests?

The above headline comes from a September 7, 2016, article published on the medical informational website Medscape. The article, as well as several others in the news, stem from an FDA report released on September 8, 2016, titled, “Ovarian Cancer Screening Tests: Safety Communication – FDA Recommends Against Use.”

fda-warns-against-using-ovarian-cancer-screening-tests-austin-tx-chiropractor-best-reviews-reputation-for-car-accident-personal-injury-lawyer-attorneyThe FDA warning notes that doctors should not recommend the screening tests to women due to the high likelihood that the test will yield inaccurate results and lead to unneeded treatments or the lack of preventative measures. In what was called a safety communication, the FDA stated, “Despite extensive research and published studies, there are currently no screening tests for ovarian cancer that are sensitive enough to reliably screen for (the cancer) without a high number of inaccurate results.”

The FDA website provided background information on ovarian cancer by noting, “Ovarian cancer occurs when abnormal cells in or near the ovaries grow and form a malignant (cancerous) tumor. In the United States, ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related death among women.”

In stating the findings for issuing this warning, the FDA explained, ” Based on the FDA’s review of available clinical data from ovarian cancer screening trials and recommendations from healthcare professional societies and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, available data do not demonstrate that currently available ovarian cancer screening tests are accurate and reliable in screening asymptomatic women for early ovarian cancer.”

The FDA issued several recommendations for both women and for doctors. For women, the recommendations include, “Be aware that there is currently no safe and effective ovarian cancer screening test. Do not rely on ovarian cancer screening test results to make health or treatment decisions.”

To doctors, the FDA makes the recommendation that physicians, “Do not recommend or use tests that claim to screen for ovarian cancer in the general population of women. Be aware that testing higher risk asymptomatic patients for ovarian cancer has no proven benefit and is not a substitute for preventive actions that may reduce their risk.”

If you or anyone you know could benefit from a better functioning nervous system, please call us at 512-452-2525 to schedule a consultation with Dr. Swanson. We are located in north central Austin, TX.


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Over 184,000 Global Deaths Each Year Caused by Sugary Drinks

Are Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Bad? Can Sugar Negatively Affect My Health?

Medical News Today (MNT) published an article on June 30, 2014, with the above headline addressing the issue of the health impact drinks with a high amount of sugar have on the population. The article is based on several studies including a study published on June 29, 2015, in the journal Circulation with the title, “Estimated Global, Regional, and National Disease Burdens Related to Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption in 2010.”

Over 184,000 Global Deaths Each Year Caused by Sugary Drinks - Austin Health ClinicThe MNT article begins by reporting that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates show that men consume an average of 178 calories from sugary drinks daily, compared to women who consume around 103 calories from these drinks daily. While some may make the point that these types of drinks should not be part of anyone’s diet, the American Heart Association (AHA) recommends consuming no more than 450 calories from these drinks in a week. This is equivalent to less than three cans of soda in a week.

Prof. Gitanjali Singh, research assistant professor at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy of Tufts University in Boston, MA, and his team analyzed sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) consumption data from 1980-2010 from 62 surveys involving 611,971 people in 51 countries. They reviewed the data to see how consuming sugary drinks impacted the death rate from diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer.

The results of the study showed that in 2010, sugar-sweetened beverages were responsible for around 184,450 deaths worldwide, with 133,000 deaths from diabetes, 45,000 deaths from cardiovascular disease and 6,450 deaths from cancer. The study also highlighted that younger adults were more negatively impacted by these drinks than were older adults. Prof. Singh commented, “The health impact of sugar-sweetened beverage intake on the young is important because younger adults form a large sector of the workforce in many countries,” he explains, “so the economic impact of sugar-sweetened beverage-related deaths and disability in this age group can be significant.”

Prof. Singh continued his concerns by adding, “It also raises concerns about the future. If these young people continue to consume high levels as they age, the effects of high consumption will be compounded by the effects of aging, leading to even higher death and disability rates from heart disease and diabetes than we are seeing now”

In the study conclusion, Prof. Gitanjali Singh and his coauthors wrote, “SSBs, are a single, modifiable component of diet, that can impact preventable death/disability in adults in high, middle, and low-income countries, indicating an urgent need for strong global prevention programs.”

If you or anyone you know could benefit from a better functioning nervous system, please call us at 512-452-2525 to schedule a consultation with Dr. Swanson.


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